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Frontiers of Economics in China

ISSN 1673-3444

ISSN 1673-3568(Online)

CN 11-5744/F

Postal Subscription Code 80-978

Front. Econ. China    2014, Vol. 9 Issue (3) : 460-483    https://doi.org/10.3868/s060-003-014-0022-8
research-article |
Productivity, Economic Growth and the Middle Income Trap: Implications for China
Yanrui Wu()
Business School, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
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Abstract

This paper explores the middle income trap (MIT) concept from the perspective of productivity growth. Through the examination of cross-country historical statistics as well as China’s regional data, it sheds light on the debate about whether the Chinese economy can avoid the middle income trap. It should be one of the first papers proposing an analytical framework to address this controversial issue. The findings should have important implications for economic policies guiding China’s development in the coming decades.

Keywords productivity      middle income trap (MIT)      economic growth      Chinese economy     
Issue Date: 23 September 2014
 Cite this article:   
Yanrui Wu. Productivity, Economic Growth and the Middle Income Trap: Implications for China[J]. Front. Econ. China, 2014, 9(3): 460-483.
 URL:  
http://academic.hep.com.cn/fec/EN/10.3868/s060-003-014-0022-8
http://academic.hep.com.cn/fec/EN/Y2014/V9/I3/460
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