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Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering

ISSN 2095-2201

ISSN 2095-221X(Online)

CN 10-1013/X

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Front. Environ. Sci. Eng.    2017, Vol. 11 Issue (6) : 9    https://doi.org/10.1007/s11783-017-0950-6
RESEARCH ARTICLE |
Transport and selectivity of indium through polymer inclusion membrane in hydrochloric acid medium
Xiaorong Meng1,2,3, Conghui Wang2, Pan Zhou2, Xiaoqiang Xin2, Lei Wang2,3()
1. School of Science, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an 710055, China
2. School of Environmental & Municipal Engineering, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an 710055, China
3. Key Laboratory of Membrane Separation of Shaanxi Province, Xi’an 710055, China
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Abstract

The mass transfer of PIM to In(III) is of high efficiency.

The separation selectivity of In(III)/Cu(II) is related to the pH value and Cl concentration of the feed phase.

The mass transfer of In(III) is controlled by chemical interaction.

The stability of the membrane is improved by increasing the membrane thickness.

In the present paper, a polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) containing polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (D2EHPA) which was used as extracting agent was used for the recovery of In(III) ions in hydrochloric acid medium. The effects of carrier concentration, feed phase pH, strip phase HCl concentration, temperature on the transport, and the membrane’s stability and thickness were examined. And the conditions for the selective separation of In(III) and Cu(II) were optimized. The results showed that the transport of In(III) across PIM was consistent with the first order kinetics equation, and also it was controlled by both the diffusion of the metal complex in the membrane and the chemical reaction at the interface of the boundary layers. The transport flux (J0) was inversely proportional to the membrane thickness, however, the transport stability improved as the membrane thickness increased. The transport flux of In(III) and Cu(II) was decreased by excessive acidity of feed phase and high concentration of Cl. The selectivity separation coefficient of In(III)/Cu(II) was up to 34.33 when the original concentration of both In(III) and Cu(II) was 80 mg·L−1 as well as the pH of the feed phase and the concentration of Cl in the adjusting context were0.6 and 0.5 mol·L−1, respectively. Within the range of pH= 1–3, the separation selectivity of In(III)/Cu(II) reached the peak in the case when the Cl concentration was 0.7 mol·L−1 .

Keywords Polymer inclusion membrane      Selective transport      D2EHPA      In(III)      Cu(II)     
Corresponding Authors: Lei Wang   
Issue Date: 05 June 2017
 Cite this article:   
Xiaorong Meng,Conghui Wang,Pan Zhou, et al. Transport and selectivity of indium through polymer inclusion membrane in hydrochloric acid medium[J]. Front. Environ. Sci. Eng., 2017, 11(6): 9.
 URL:  
http://academic.hep.com.cn/fese/EN/10.1007/s11783-017-0950-6
http://academic.hep.com.cn/fese/EN/Y2017/V11/I6/9
Fig.1  Scanning electron microscopy of various carrier contents surface of PIM
Fig.2  (a)Variation of In(III) concentration in both phases during the transport; (b) Kinetics of In(III) transport through PIM (Transport conditions: Feed phase: 80 mg·L−1 In(III), pH= 1.0, Stripping phase: 4 mol·L−1 HCl, Carrier: 69%. Results are means of three independent experiments performed at T= 30±1°C)
Fig.3  Effect of D2EHPA concentration on the transport of In(III) through PIM (Feed phase: 80 mg·L−1 In(III), pH= 2.0, Stripping phase: 4 mol·L−1 HCl. Results are means of three independent experiments performed at T= 30±1°C)
Fig.4  Effect of the thickness of PIM on the transport (Feed phase: 80 mg·L−1 In(III), pH= 2.0, Stripping phase: 4 mol·L−1 HCl, Carrier: 69%, Operation temperature: 30±1°C)
Fig.5  Stability of PIMs with different thicknesses (Feed phase: 80 mg·L−1 In(III), pH= 2.0, Stripping phase: 4 mol·L−1 HCl, Carrier: 69%, Operation temperature: 30±1°C)
Fig.6  Arrhenius plot of In(III) transport through PIM (Feed phase: 80 mg·L−1 In(III), pH= 2.0, Stripping phase: 4 mol·L−1HCl, Thickness of PIM: 160 μm, Carrier: 69%)
Fig.7  (a) Effect of pH in feed phase on the In(III) transport in 4 mol·L−1 HCl of strip phase (b) Effect of stripping HCl concentration on the In(III) transport in pH 2 of feed phase (Feed phase: 80 mg·L−1 In(III), Carrier: 69%, Thickness of PIM: 160 μm. Results are means of three independent experiments performed at T= 30±1°C)
pHCClmental ionK/(10−6·s−1)P/(µm·s1)S
0.30.5In(III)7.10833.39568.53
Cu(II)0.83330.3981
0.7In(III)5.11412.44306.35
Cu(II)0.80490.3845
0.60.25In(III)9.97224.763726.20
Cu(II)0.38060.1818
0.5In(III)11.12025.342134.33
Cu(II)0.32570.1556
0.7In(III)10.72245.122129.35
Cu(II)0.36530.1745
10.1In(III)14.16676.767414.97
Cu(II)0.94640.4521
0.25In(III)14.89207.114015.97
Cu(II)0.93240.4454
0.5In(III)15.10287.214616.73
Cu(II)0.90280.4313
0.7In(III)14.98937.160421.47
Cu(II)0.69810.3335
1In(III)14.63896.993016.89
Cu(II)0.86670.4140
20.01In(III)11.34725.42067.32
Cu(II)1.54990.7404
0.1In(III)17.25008.240312.18
Cu(II)1.41680.6768
0.25In(III)17.34528.285813.36
Cu(II)1.29800.6201
0.5In(III)15.007.165515.00
Cu(II)1.00000.4777
0.7In(III)14.79787.068920.03
Cu(II)0.73870.3529
1In(III)14.42816.892317.72
Cu(II)0.81410.3889
30.01In(III)7.77783.71555.49
Cu(II)1.41670.6768
0.1In(III)17.02228.131512.01
Cu(II)1.41670.6768
0.25In(III)17.67388.442813.14
Cu(II)1.34500.6425
0.5In(III)18.30568.744614.52
Cu(II)1.26110.6024
0.7In(III)17.94728.573418.78
Cu(II)0.95560.4565
1In(III)15.31557.316215.30
Cu(II)1.00100.4782
Tab.1  Permeability coefficient (P) of In(III) and Cu(II) selectivity coefficient (S) in competitive metal transport through PIM in different feed phase pH. (Feed phase: 80 mg·L−1 In(III) and 80 mg·L−1Cu(II), Feed phase pH: 0.3, 0.6, 1,2,3, Stripping phase: 4 mol·L HCl, Carrier: 69%, Operation temperature 30°C)
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