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Frontiers of Medicine

ISSN 2095-0217

ISSN 2095-0225(Online)

CN 11-5983/R

Postal Subscription Code 80-967

2018 Impact Factor: 1.847

Front Med Chin    2009, Vol. 3 Issue (1) : 76-90     DOI: 10.1007/s11684-009-0002-0
RESEARCH ARTCILE |
Administration with Bushenkangshuai Tang alleviates UV irradiation- and oxidative stress-induced lifespan defects in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans
Qi RUI1, Qin LU2, Dayong WANG1()
1. Key Laboratory of Developmental Genes and Human Diseases under the Ministry of Education, Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Southeast University Medical School, Nanjing 210009, China; 2. Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Nanjing 210004, China
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Abstract  

During normal metabolism, oxidative byproducts will inevitably generate and damage molecules thereby impairing their biological functions, including the aging process. Bushenkangshuai Tang (补肾抗衰方, BT) is a traditional Chinese medicine widely used for clinically treating premature ovarian failure. In the present study, BT administration at high concentrations significantly increased lifespan, slowed aging-related decline, and delayed accumulation of aging-related cellular damage in wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans. BT administration could further largely alleviate the aging defects induced by UV and oxidative stresses, and BT administration at different concentrations could largely rescue the aging defects in mev-1 mutant animals. The protective effects of BT administration on aging process were at least partially dependent on the Ins/IGF-like signaling pathway. Moreover, BT administration at different concentrations obviously altered the expression patterns of antioxidant genes and suppressed the severe stress responses induced by UV and oxidative stresses, suggesting that BT-induced tolerance to UV or oxidative stress might result from reactive oxygen species scavenging. BT administration during development was not necessarily a requirement for UV and oxidative stress resistance, and the concentrations of administrated BT examined were not toxic for nematodes. Therefore, BT administration could effectively retrieve the aging defects induced by UV irradiation and oxidative stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Keywords Bushenkangshuai Tang      UV irradiation      oxidative stress      tissue senescence      lifespan      Caenorhabditis elegans     
Corresponding Authors: WANG Dayong,Email:dayongw@seu.edu.cn   
Issue Date: 05 March 2009
URL:  
http://academic.hep.com.cn/fmd/EN/10.1007/s11684-009-0002-0     OR     http://academic.hep.com.cn/fmd/EN/Y2009/V3/I1/76
Fig.1  Treatment with prolonged lifespan and slowed aging in nematodes. (a) Treatment with at different concentrations diluted with water prolonged lifespan in exposed animals grown at 25°C. (b) Treatment with at different concentrations prolonged lifespan in exposed animals grown at 20°C. (c) Treatment with at different concentrations prolonged lifespan in exposed animals grown at 15°C. (d) Treatment with at different concentrations slowed the decline in pharynx pumping during aging. Average pumping rates (pumps per min) in 15 animals scored in two trials. Con: control. : Exposures were performed for 2 h on L4-larva stage animals with 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of examined . Data were expressed as . -test, treated . untreated; day 8, < 0.01 (50% , 75% , and 100% ); day 10, < 0.01 (50% , 75% , and 100% ). A value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant.
Fig.2  The effects of treatment on mean autofluorescence from intestine lipofuscin in day 4, day 8, and day 14 adult nematodes. Con: control. : Exposures were performed for 2 h on L4-larva stage animals with 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of examined . Data were expressed as . values were-test . control, and a value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. *: < 0.05, **: < 0.01.
Fig.3  The alleviative effects of treatment on defects of lifespan and intestine lipofuscin induced by UV irradiation and paraquat treatment in (a) Effects of treatment with at different concentrations diluted with water on lifespan defects induced by UV irradiation in wild-type animals grown at 20°C. (b) Effects of treatment with at different concentrations on lifespan defects induced by paraquat treatment in wild-type animals grown at 20°C. (c) Effects of treatment with at different concentrations on intestine lipofuscin defects induced by UV irradiation in day 14 adult wild-type animals. (d) Effects of treatment with at different concentrations on intestine lipofuscin defects induced by paraquat treatment in day 14 adult wild-type animals. L2-stage larvae animals were irradiated on NGM plates without food at 20 J/m/min, or treated with 2 mmol/L paraquat solution for 2 h and survival at 20°C. All UV-irradiation and paraquat treatment assays were performed at 20°C, and afterwards further maintained at 20°C. Exposures were performed for 2 h on L4-larva stage animals with 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of examined . All assays were replicated more than three times. Data were expressed as . values were-test . control, and a value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. **: < 0.01.
Fig.4  Effects of treatment on stress responses in normal and UV or oxidative stress exposed wild-type nematodes. (a) Effects of treatment on stress responses in UV irradiated wild-type nematodes. (b) Effects of treatment on stress responses in paraquat treated wild-type nematodes. (c) Effects of treatment on stress responses in wild-type nematodes. Significant induction of : expression (50% of a population, above the line) was observed in wild-type N2 animals exposed to UV or oxidative stress, and administration with at high concentrations could largely recover the increased stress responses activated by UV or oxidative stress. L2-stage larvae animals were irradiated with UV on NGM plates without food at 20 J/m·min, or treated with 2 mmol/L paraquat solution for 2 h and survival at 20°C. All UV-irradiation and paraquat treatment assays were performed at 20°C, and afterwards further maintained at 20°C. Exposures were performed for 2 h on L4-larva stage animals with 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of examined . All assays were replicated more than three times. Data were expressed as . values were-test . control, and a value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. **: < 0.01.
Fig.5  Response of antioxidant genes to oxidative stress. The transcript levels of 6 antioxidant genes ( to , , and ) were detected. Para: paraquat. L2-stage larvae animals were irradiated with UV on NGM plates without food at 20 J/m·min, or treated with 2 mmol/L paraquat solution for 2 h and survival at 20°C. All UV-irradiation and paraquat treatment assays were performed at 20°C and afterwards further maintained at 20°C. Exposures were performed for 2 h on L4-larva stage animals with 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of examined . All assays were replicated more than three times. Data were expressed as .
Fig.6  Effects of treatment on lifespan of nematode mutant. con: control. (a) Lifespan of controls and treated mutants at 20°C. (b) Comparison of mean lifespan between treated wild-type and mutant animals at different concentrations at 20°C. Exposures were performed for 2 h on L4-larva stage animals with 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of examined . All assays were replicated more than three times. Data were expressed as .values were-test . N2, and a value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. < 0.01.
Fig.7  Effects of treatment on lifespan of and nematode mutants. con: control. (a) Lifespan of controls and treated mutants at 20°C. (b) Comparison of mean lifespan between BT treated wild-type and mutant animals at different concentrations at 20°C. (c) Lifespan of controls and treated mutants at 20°C. (d) Comparison of mean lifespan between treated wild-type and mutant animals at different concentrations at 20°C. Exposures were performed for 2 h on L4-larva stage animals with 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of examined . All assays were replicated more than three times. Data were expressed as .values were-test. N2, and a value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. **<0.01.
Fig.8  Treatment with after development conferred UV and oxidative stress resistance. con: control. (a) Effects of administration on lifespan of wild-type animals. (b) Mean lifespan of controls and administrated wild-type animals. (c) Effects of administration on lifespan of UV irradiated wild-type animals. (d) Mean lifespan of controls and administrated wild-type animals exposed to UV irradiation. (e) Effects of administration on lifespan of paraquat treated wild-type animals. (f) Mean lifespan of controls and administrated wild-type animals exposed to paraquat treatment. L2-stage larvae animals were irradiated with UV on NGM plates without food at 20 J/m·min, or treated with 2 mmol/L paraquat solution for 2 h and survival at 20°C. All UV-irradiation and paraquat treatment assays were performed at 20°C, and afterwards further maintained at 20°C. Exposures were performed for 2 h on L4-larva stage animals with 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of examined . All assays were replicated more than three times. Data were expressed as . *: < 0.05, **: < 0.01.
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