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Frontiers of Philosophy in China

ISSN 1673-3436

ISSN 1673-355X(Online)

CN 11-5743/B

Postal Subscription Code 80-983

Front Phil Chin    2009, Vol. 4 Issue (1) : 88-115     DOI: 10.1007/s11466-009-0006-5
research-article |
The Philosophies of Laozi and Zhuangzi and the Bamboo-slip Essay Hengxian
QIANG Yu()
School of Philosophy and Sociology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
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Abstract  

The bamboo slip essay Hengxian 恒先is historically valuable because it serves to further the ontological understanding and comprehension of issues related to the existence of the universe from the perspective of Laozi’s Daoist thought. Hengxian explores important propositions such as how “Qi originated and activated itself” and “they came out of the same source but differed in nature” from several aspects. The idea that “Hengxian is ‘being’ without any definiteness” responds to the issue of the relationship of difference and identity of all things in the world, and thus examines the interdependent relationships between subjects and objects. It proposes that humans can further understand the existence of the universe through cognitive activities and practices such as “analysis and comparison” in which objective realities are checked. The issues discussed in Hengxian are consistent with Laozi’s Dao de jing, the works of Zhuangzi, Huangdi sijing 黄帝四经 (The Four Classics from the Emperor Yellow) and other Daoist works, and deserve significant attention.

Keywords qi      Dao      name      enlightenment     
Corresponding Authors: QIANG Yu,Email:qiangy@sohu.com   
Issue Date: 05 March 2009
URL:  
http://academic.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/10.1007/s11466-009-0006-5     OR     http://academic.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/Y2009/V4/I1/88
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