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Frontiers of Philosophy in China

ISSN 1673-3436

ISSN 1673-355X(Online)

CN 11-5743/B

Postal Subscription Code 80-983

Front. Philos. China    2015, Vol. 10 Issue (2) : 192-200    https://doi.org/10.3868/s030-004-015-0015-5
research-article |
Ars Erotica and Ars Gastronomica in Shusterman’s Somaesthetics
Russell Pryba()
Department of Philosophy, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff AZ 86011, USA
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Abstract

This paper explores the roles of the erotic and gastronomic arts in Richard Shusterman’s somaesthetics. By discussing the relationship between moral education and the cultivation of gustatory taste in classical Chinese philosophy, this paper suggests future avenues of research for somaesthetics that draw on the rich tradition of thinking about food and the body in Chinese philosophy.

Keywords ars erotica      gastronomy      somaesthetics      Richard Shusterman      Chinese philosophy     
Issue Date: 19 June 2015
 Cite this article:   
Russell Pryba. Ars Erotica and Ars Gastronomica in Shusterman’s Somaesthetics[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(2): 192-200.
 URL:  
http://academic.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/10.3868/s030-004-015-0015-5
http://academic.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/Y2015/V10/I2/192
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