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Frontiers of Philosophy in China

ISSN 1673-3436

ISSN 1673-355X(Online)

CN 11-5743/B

Postal Subscription Code 80-983

Front. Philos. China    2017, Vol. 12 Issue (1) : 26-37    https://doi.org/10.3868/s030-006-017-0003-2
Orginal Article |
A Process Interpretation of Daoist Thought
Alan Fox()
Department of Philosophy, University of Delaware, Delaware 19716, USA
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Abstract

Despite the fact that the Dao De Jing 道德經 is one of the most frequently translated texts in history, most of these translations share certain unexamined and problematic assumptions which often make it seem as though the text is irrational, incoherent, and full of non sequiturs. Frequently, these assumptions involve the imposition of historically anachronous, linguistically unsound, and philosophically problematic categories and attitudes onto the text. One of the main causes of the problem is the persistent tendency on the part of most translators to read the first line of the text as referring to or implying the existence of some kind of “eternal Dao.” These are what I term “ontological” readings, as opposed to the “process” reading I will be articulating here.

Keywords Dao De Jing      dao      de      weiwuwei      process philosophy      Zhuangzi      paradox      Whitehead      Amds and Hall      William James     
Issue Date: 24 April 2017
 Cite this article:   
Alan Fox. A Process Interpretation of Daoist Thought[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2017, 12(1): 26-37.
 URL:  
http://academic.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/10.3868/s030-006-017-0003-2
http://academic.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/Y2017/V12/I1/26
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