Please wait a minute...
Frontiers of Philosophy in China

ISSN 1673-3436

ISSN 1673-355X(Online)

CN 11-5743/B

Postal Subscription Code 80-983

Front. Philos. China    2019, Vol. 14 Issue (2) : 264-283    https://doi.org/10.3868/s030-008-019-0016-8
SPECIAL THEME
Encounter between Soul and Human Nature: An Examination of Xia Dachang’s “Xingshuo”
HUANG Zhipeng()
School of Social Development, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002, China
 Download: PDF(334 KB)  
 Export: BibTeX | EndNote | Reference Manager | ProCite | RefWorks
Abstract

Matteo Ricci introduced into China the Western theory of soul, a term which he translated as linghun 靈魂. Afterwards, two other Italian Jesuits, Giulio Aleni and Francesco Sambiasi, separately completed two Chinese interpretations of the De Anima (On the Soul), the former privileging the word linghun, and the later, yanima 亞尼瑪, a transliteration for anima. Xia Dachang 夏大常 (Mathias Hsia) is probably the first Chinese person to write specifically on the topic of the soul. However, he used a different term, lingxing 靈性 (human spiritual nature), and also he titled his work “The Theory of Human Nature” (“Xingshuo” 性說). Xia’s work has received little scholarly attention, and this paper aims at investigating how he adopts the Western theory of the soul, why he still uses the concept of lingxing, and which Chinese editions of De Anima or other works written by the Jesuits had influenced him. We shall also see how Xia Dachang uses traditional Chinese sources and Catholic doctrine to support his viewpoint of human nature and how he criticizes theories of human nature within Chinese philosophy. This will enable us to comprehend how Chinese Christians in the Early Qing dynasty understood the theory of the soul and to reflect on the contemporary relevance of this theory in Chinese culture today.

Keywords soul      human nature      Jesuits      “Xingshuo”     
Issue Date: 15 July 2019
 Cite this article:   
HUANG Zhipeng. Encounter between Soul and Human Nature: An Examination of Xia Dachang’s “Xingshuo”[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2019, 14(2): 264-283.
 URL:  
http://academic.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/10.3868/s030-008-019-0016-8
http://academic.hep.com.cn/fpc/EN/Y2019/V14/I2/264
[1] Michele Ferrero. Motivation to Act in Confucianism and Christianity: In Matteo Ricci’s The True Meaning of the Lord of Heaven (Tianzhu Shiyi 天主實義)[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2019, 14(2): 226-247.
[2] Karyn Lai. Emotional Attachment and Its Limits: Mengzi, Gaozi and the Guodian Discussions[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2019, 14(1): 132-151.
[3] Yasuhira Yahei Kanayama. Socrates’ Humaneness: What His Last Words Meant[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2019, 14(1): 111-131.
[4] NI Peimin. Toward a Gongfu Reconstruction of Confucianism —Responses to Comments by Huang Yong, Fan Ruiping, and Wang Qingjie[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2018, 13(2): 240-253.
[5] Teun Tieleman. The Early Stoics and Aristotelian Ethics[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2016, 11(1): 104-121.
[6] GUO Yi. The Origin and Differentiation of the Theories of Human Nature in Pre-Qin China[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(2): 212-238.
[7] André Laks. Aristotle’s Immovable Movers: A Sketch[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(2): 273-286.
[8] BAO Yongling. Water, Plant, Light, and Mirror: On the Root Metaphors of the Heart-Mind in Wang Yangming’s Thought[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2015, 10(1): 95-112.
[9] Hektor K. T. Yan. Beyond a Theory of Human Nature: Towards an Alternative Interpretation of Mencius’ Ethics[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2014, 9(3): 396-416.
[10] Thomas M. Robinson. Aristotle, the Intellect, and Cognition[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2014, 9(2): 229-240.
[11] Jonathan Israel. The Battle over Confucius and Classical Chinese Philosophy in European Early Enlightenment Thought (1670-1730)[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2013, 8(2): 183-198.
[12] DING Ji. The Manifestation Range of Innately Good Knowledge and Ability, and the Danger of Separation: On Zhuzi’s Question about Understanding Words[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2012, 7(2): 217-243.
[13] LI Youguang , . The True or the Artificial: Theories on Human Nature before Mencius and Xunzi—Based on “Sheng is from Ming, and Ming is from Tian”[J]. Front. Philos. China, 2010, 5(1): 31-50.
[14] LIANG Tao. Mencius and the tradition of articulating human nature in terms of growth[J]. Front Phil Chin, 2009, 4(2): 180-197.
Viewed
Full text


Abstract

Cited

  Shared   
  Discussed